i LAVA you <3

Well, I haven’t posted in a while! The last couple weeks, we have been busy with Valentine’s day and learning about VOLCANOES! SOOOOO much fun! We started the week off with a mentos and diet coke geyser! I got a geyser tube from my cooperating teacher when I graduated, it’s really cool and from Steve Spangler, and i haven’t used it yet! The kids loved it and it was a great way to get them interested in eruptions and volcanoes.

We also watched the Pixar short called “LAVA”. It’s about a volcano that wants someone to “lava” and he has a really catchy song too. You can look it up on YouTube but it’s not the actual video, it’s a music video. The whole thing is in the special features of the movie “Inside Out” I won’t spoil it for you in case you wan to see it, but it’s so cute and sweet. The kids loved it to and even pointed out some of the things we have learned about.

We discussed what a volcano is made of, what comes out of them, and the shape of a volcano: one of my kids described it as a “triangle with the top chopped off“.

After our discussion I introduced them to oil pastels. We talked about the colors we would need to made just the volcano part. They decided to use brown, black and grey. They drew the volcanoes with the pastels and used red, yellow, and orange paint for the lava. They turned out great!

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This is G’s view from the TOP of the volcano.
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I also let them experiment with baking soda, vinegar, and eye droppers. This is always a great go-to science activity. What 4 year old doesn’t like making things fizz up?!

We TRIED to make a volcano out of Legos. . . it didn’t work. It was very hard to get them to stay up and by the time we finished (even with my help) it didn’t look at all like a volcano. So, we decided to just make one out of sand on the playground. Each child had a part (collecting sand, molding the volcano and, adding pop rocks, baking soda, or vinegar). We found the pop rocks didn’t add too much more popping to the eruption but when they landed on the sand they popped in it and made holes. A pretty cool discovery.

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All those holes where the wet sand is are from the Pop rocks!!

That was the end to our Volcano week. I meant to show them the videos of real volcanoes erupting, but we just ran out of time.

Here are some of the books we read to further our knowledge!

Enjoy!

❤ Ali

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Shades of People

At the beginning of the year we started our self investigations. We read a book called Shades of People.

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I’m going to copy and paste that documentation panel i made for this on here so you can see how I write them and what it sounds/looks like. Here goes . . .

 

Shades of People

We read Shades of People, which explores the many different shades of human skin, and points out that skin does not reveal what someone is like on the inside. This prompted a discussion about the different shades of our skin. Right away the kids noticed the differences and similarities in their skin.

“Mine is just like hers!”

“My arm is browner than his.”

“Ours is kinda close, but not really that much.”

I provided skin shade cards and prompted the kids to find a shade that matched themselves.

“Mine and his are the same!”

“Mine isn’t on here.”

“It’s kind of close to that one.”

Later I provided brown, yellow, white and black paint and prompted the children to mix colors together to get their shade of skin color. They started by picking the colors they saw in their skin and adding some to a plate to mix them.

“It’s turning white-brown.”

“I need more brown.”

“I need it darker. More brown.”

“I’m adding yellow because I like bananas.”

“Hey it’s turning my color a little bit. Or maybe pie.”

After they mixed them together they tested the color against their skin to see if they needed to add anything to it. They understood that adding white makes colors lighter and adding darker colors like brown and black makes colors darker.

After mixing the right shade they painted their hands and made hand prints.

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I hope that was helpful! If you have any questions please let me know!!

❤ Ali

Like I don’t have enough to do already. . .

This is the excerpt for your very first post.

I’ve thought about starting a blog for a while now but I keep going back and forth between “Wow! That’s a great idea I should share it with other people.” to “Who in the world wants to read about your life and what you do? I don’t even want to relive it long enough to write it down! Ha ha!”So I decided that, with Christmas break coming up, I would try it out and see how I like it.

Anyways, an intro to ME! My name is Ali and I am a prek teacher from South Carolina! I have a class of 13 4-year-olds this year. There are 2 other teachers in my grade level and they are phenomenal, I don’t know what I would do without my team! We are in transition to a more Reggio inspired classroom and curriculum. We started at the beginning of the year in August and it has been quite an adventure!  Last summer we got a new director for our center (honestly I can’t say enough good things about her) she came to us from a Reggio inspired preschool in SC. Once my team and I heard that she came from a Reggio background we started researching it and fell in love. And once we spoke with her about it we knew we had to start implementing aspects if it as soon as we could!

I don’t claim to be an expert on Reggio by any means but for those who don’t know much about it; it’s a more natural approach to teaching where the classroom is the third teacher (after the parents and you). What you teach goes along with what interests the child. The children are seen as capable learners, which they are. I have a board on Pinterest dedicated to Reggio classroom and got a lot of my info from pins on there.